What Amazon Has Taught Your Customers (Whether You Like It or Not)

With Amazon.com selling more than its 12 biggest competitors combined, it’s time to learn the new rules of e-commerce. Like it or not, Amazon is setting the standards. Here’s what customers have come to believe:

Shipping Is Free (and I’ll Buy More to Make it Free)
80% of online shoppers say free shipping is “very important” when making a purchase online. 68% of e-commerce transactions now receive free shipping as part of the order. 49% of consumers have walked away from a purchase due to shipping costs. Expect these numbers to grow.

Free Shipping

source: Comscore

More Information Should Make My Experience Better
Amazon uses consumption pattern data for classic marketing tactics:
Cross-selling – “Frequently Bought Together”
Up-selling – “What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?”
Creating a sense of scarcity – “Only 4 Left In Stock – Order Soon”
Creating a sense of urgency – “Want it tomorrow?”

Images Matter (the More, the Better)
Images should be big, clear, from multiple angles, and show someone using the product. White backgrounds are best.

What Other Customers Say is More Important than What You Say
You can increase ecommerce conversion rate up to 76% by adding product reviews to your online store. 77% of consumers read reviews before purchasing online.

Mobile Needs to Work As Well as My Computer
Nearly 60 percent of Amazon.com customers shopped using a mobile device last holiday.

I Want a Relationship (and I’m Willing to Pay for One)
Amazon signed up over 10 million new Amazon Prime members last holiday. Add that to the 50 million already signed up and the trend is clear.

So how do you compete?

Comments

  • Erica Banfield Moore
    Reply

    Chris. I agree that differentiation in terms of both products and the customer experience is a critical success factor for visionary organisations. This will indeed determine their very existence and their ability to survive in the evolving market place. Customers are constantly bombarded with freedom of choice.